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Social Security Disability – Mental and Mood-Related Disorders

Social Security Disability  - Mental and Mood-Related DisordersSocial Security Disability – Mental and Mood-Related Disorders

The Social Security Disability Insurance Benefit (SSDI) can be available to a person who has mental and mood-related disorders. To qualify for SSD, you must have a disability that has lasted or is expected to last at least one year or result in death. You must also have worked and paid Social Security taxes long enough.

What are mental and mood-related disorders?

Mental and mood-related disorders involve abnormal thinking, emotions, and behaviors. Examples include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and autism. These types of disorders are often chronic, meaning they last a long time, can be intermittent and can vary in severity. Most people with this disorder need lifelong treatment.

How Does Mental and Mood-related Disorders Affect a Person?

Mental and mood-related disorders can affect a person’s ability to function in many areas of life. For example, they may have difficulty:
● Holding a job
● Taking care of personal needs, such as hygiene and eating
● Interacting with other people
● Sleeping
● Thinking clearly, etc.

What are the symptoms of mental and mood-related disorders?

The symptoms of mental and mood-related disorders vary depending on the specific disorder. However, common symptoms can include changes in sleeping or eating habits, withdrawal from friends and activities, sudden changes in mood or behavior, and difficulty concentrating.

How Can SSD Help People With Mental and Mood-related Disorders?

SSD can provide much-needed financial assistance to those suffering from mental and mood-related disorders. SSD benefits are available to those who are unable to work due to their disability. To qualify for SSD, you must have a disability that is expected to last at least one year or result in death. If you are suffering from a mental or mood-related disorder, you can qualify for SSD benefits if your disorder prevents you from working. SSD benefits can help you cover the costs of medical treatment, medications, and other necessary expenses.

If you think you may be eligible for SSD benefits, it is important to speak with an experienced Social Security Disability attorney. An attorney can help you gather the evidence you need to prove your disability and file your claim. An attorney can also help you navigate the SSD application and appeals process.

Medical Requirements For Receiving Disability Benefits For Mental and Mood-related Disorders

To be eligible for SSD benefits for mental and mood-related disorders, you must show certain medical requirements. The medical requirements for mental and mood-related disorders can be found in the Social Security Administration’s “Blue Book.” The Blue Book is a listing of all the impairments that qualify for SSD benefits.

To be eligible for SSD benefits, you must meet the criteria for one of the mental disorders listed in the Blue Book. In addition, your mental disorder must meet the severity requirements. The severity requirements are different for each mental disorder.

For example, if you are applying for SSD benefits for schizophrenia, you must show that your disorder meets the criteria for schizophrenia and that your disorder is severe enough to prevent you from working.

To show that your mental disorder is severe enough to prevent you from working, you must provide medical evidence showing that your disorder significantly limits your ability to function in one or more areas of life.

The medical evidence can come from a variety of sources, such as:
– Your treating physician
– Psychiatric evaluations
– Psychological testing
– Hospital records
– School records, etc.

It is important to note that you can still qualify for SSD benefits even if you have not been diagnosed with a mental disorder. If you are experiencing symptoms of a mental disorder, but have not yet been diagnosed, you can still qualify for SSD benefits.

Contact a Social Security Disability Lawyer

You stand a better chance of receiving disability benefits with the help of a qualified SSD attorney. An SSD attorney will;

Gather Evidence To Prove Disability

An SSD attorney will gather the evidence you need to prove your disability. This can include getting copies of your medical records, letters from your treating physician, and psychological evaluations.

An SSD attorney will also help you get any other evidence that may be necessary to prove your case.

File Your Claim

After gathering the evidence you need to prove your disability, an SSD attorney will help you file your claim. The SSD claims process can be complex and confusing. An attorney can help make sure that your claim is filed correctly and that all necessary evidence is submitted.

Appeal a Denial

If your SSD claim is denied, an SSD attorney can help you appeal the decision. The appeals process can be complex, and an attorney can help make sure that your appeal is filed correctly and that all necessary evidence is submitted.

Represent You at Your Disability Hearing

If your appeal is approved for a hearing, an expert attorney can represent you at the hearing. The hearing is the most important part of the SSD appeals process. An expert attorney can help make sure that you are prepared for the hearing and that all of your evidence is presented in a persuasive way.

An SSD attorney will work tirelessly to get you the disability benefits you need and deserve. If you or someone you know is suffering from a mental or mood-related disorder, contact Shea Fugate, P.A. the expert SSD lawyer today for a free consultation. Do not try to go through the SSD process alone.

Frequently Asked Questions About SSD Benefits For Mental and Mood-related Disorders and Their Answers

Q: What is the Social Security Administration’s definition of a mental disorder?

Ans: The Social Security Administration (SSA) defines a mental disorder as “a medically determinable impairment of an individual’s ability to function in one or more major life activities.”

Q: What are some common mental and mood-related disorders that can qualify someone for SSD benefits?

Ans: Some common mental and mood-related disorders that can qualify someone for SSD benefits include:
– Anxiety disorders
– Bipolar disorder
– Depression
– Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
– Schizophrenia

Q: What are the severity requirements for mental and mood-related disorders?

Ans: To qualify for SSD benefits, your mental disorder must be severe enough to prevent you from working. The SSA uses a 5-step process to determine whether your mental disorder is severe enough to prevent you from working. Speak to an SSD attorney today.

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