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Veterans Disability for PTSD

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health condition in which a survivor of a traumatic event has difficulties recovering due to reliving the event for months, years, or the rest of their life. When triggered, the survivor’s memories of the event are brought back to the forefront, causing crippling depression, anxiety, fear, and physical declines in health. According to research, between 13.5 percent and 30 percent of U.S. troops deployed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars screened positive for PTSD. Over half a million U.S. soldiers have been diagnosed with PTSD in the past 13 years, though if estimates are correct, the number who suffer from PTSD is likely much higher.

PTSD Among Veterans and Service Members is a Big Problem

Anyone who survives or witnesses a traumatic, terrifying event can develop PTSD. Common examples of situation in which individuals develop PTSD include traffic collisions, rape, assault, childhood abuse, and of course military combat and training. PTSD and other mental health issues that service members develop actually take more lives than war. Between 2008 and 2017, 60,000 veterans died by suicide, according to Military.com. Suicide is, of course, not the only risk posed by PTSD. Those with PTSD have a harder time earning a living, paying for medical treatment, and affording therapy and psychiatry treatment.

Symptoms of PTSD

Symptoms range from changes in mood to physical manifestations. These include:

  • Depression;
  • Anxiety;
  • Avoiding certain situations;
  • Negative self thought;
  • Hopelessness;
  • Numbness;
  • Memory problems;
  • Fatigue;
  • Problems concentrating;
  • Insomnia;
  • Being easily startled or frightened;
  • Self-destructive behavior;
  • Guilt or shame;
  • Eating disorders;
  • Alcoholism;
  • Drug abuse;
  • Suicidal thoughts or acts; and
  • More.

How to Qualify For VA Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Benefits

The Veterans Administration offers benefits for service members who have been diagnosed with PTSD. In order to qualify, the following must be true:

  • The “stressor”, or traumatic event, happened during service;
  • Because of your symptoms, you are unable to function as well as you did before; and
  • You were diagnosed with PTSD by a doctor.

Qualifying traumatic events include: Serious injury, personal or sexual trauma, sexual violation, or you were threatened with injury, sexual assault, or death.

PTSD Benefits for Veterans

If you, and the stressor, meet the above criteria, you may be eligible for the following benefits awarded to veterans with PTSD:

  • Health care;
  • PTSD treatment; and
  • Financial compensation. 

Contact an Orlando Veterans Affairs PTSD Attorney Today

Filing for and receiving VA benefits for PTSD can be a difficult, time-consuming task, and many veterans are immediately disqualified for simple administrative errors. Others may have been improperly diagnosed by a physician that did not believe they suffered from PTSD. Whether you have been denied, or have not yet filed for PTSD benefits, an attorney can help your cause. Our Orlando veterans’ disability benefits attorneys can help you qualify for compensation, treatment, and medical benefits for the debilitating symptoms of PTSD that you live with day in and day out. Call the Law Offices of Shea A. Fugate, P.A. today to schedule a consultation at no cost.

 

Resource:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5047000/#:~:text=In%20one%20major%20study%20of,as%2020%25%20to%2030%25.&text=As%20many%20as%20500%2C000%20U.S.,have%20been%20diagnosed%20with%20PTSD.

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